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B.A. in English

The department offers the Bachelor of Arts in English and provides its majors with a broad range of introductory and advanced courses, and with independent study and research opportunities, including a senior seminar. The course of study introduces students to important literary texts and the cultural and historical forces that have shaped these works. It allows students to explore the complex intellectual, philosophical, aesthetic, and moral issues reflected in literature, enabling them to develop their verbal and analytical skills and strengthening their understanding of the relationship of literature to other disciplines. The English major provides a well-rounded undergraduate education and serves as an excellent foundation for a number of careers, including teaching, writing, publishing, journalism, business, and law.

General Requirements for the English Major:  83 hours

  • OREN 101/102, Foundations for College Success: 2 hours
  • Physical Education: 2 hours
  • Humanities: 19 hours (excluding the foreign language requirement)
  • Foreign Language Requirement: 12 hours
  • Social/Behavioral Sciences: 18 hours
  • Natural Sciences/Mathematics: 16 hours
  • Free Electives: 14 hours

Major Requirements for the English Major: 42 hours  

Course Number - Course Title - Credit Hours

ENGL 202 - Advanced Composition for English Majors -   3 
ENGL 205 or 206 - World Literature -   3 
ENGL 207 - Survey of American Literature I  -   3
ENGL 208 - Survey of American Literature II  -   3
ENGL 301 - Survey of English Literature I  -   3 
ENGL 302 - Survey of English Literature II  -   3 
ENGL 304 - Shakespeare  -   3 
ENGL 305 - Modern English Grammar & Linguistics  -   3 
ENGL 330 or 331 - Black American Literature  -   3
ENGL 400 - Senior Seminar  -   3 
ENGL 410 - Literary Theory  -   3
One elective in a literary genre or period -   3
Two additional electives in English -   6

                                                      TOTAL  42

Grand Total for English Major: 125 hours 

English Major Curriculum Sheet (pdf)

The English Minor

Requirements:

One writing course (beyond English 101 and 102)             3 hours

English and American literature courses                             9 hours

English electives                                                                  6 hours

Total                                                                  18 hours

For more information about the English minor, call (334) 727-8100.

English Faculty

Dr. Adaku T. Ankumah

Professor of English

Department Chair

Office: Kenney Hall 70-303

Office Phone: 334-727-8100

Email: aankumah@tuskegee.edu


Dr. Zanice Bond

Associate Professor of English

Office: Kenney Hall 70-310

Office Phone: 334-727-8104

Email: zbond@tuskegee.edu

Dr. Rhonda Collier

Professor of English

Director, Tuskegee University Global Office

Office: Kenney Hall 70-120

Office Phone: 334-727-8451

Email: rcollier@tuskegee.edu
Dr. Rhonda Collier


Dr. Benjamin Fishkin

Associate Professor of English

Office: Kenney Hall 70-308

Office Phone: 334-727-8931

Email: bfishkin@tuskegee.edu

Ph.D. University of Alabama

M.A. Miami University

B.A. University of Michigan

Research areas: literature and anglophone studies

Representative Publications and Presentations: 

  • The Repressed Expressed: Novel Perspectives on African and Black Diasporic Literature Edited by Adaku T. Ankumah, Bill F. Ndi and Benjamin Hart Fishkin (January 17, 2017)
  • “The Inner Narrative in Francis B. Nyamnjoh’s Souls Forgotten” in Secrets, Silences and Betrayals Edited by  Bill F. Ndi (August 7, 2015)
  • Co-author with Adaku T. Ankumah and Bill F. Ndi “Character Nomenclature, the Bead-string in Thomas Jing’s Tale of An African Woman” in Nomenclatural Poetization and Globalization Edited by Adaku T. Ankumah (October 20, 2014)
  • “Names, Power Relationships and Influences in Francis B. Nyamnjoh’s Married But Available” in Nomenclatural Poetization and Globalization Edited by Adaku T. Ankumah (October 20, 2014)                                                                                              
  • A War of Ideas: American Thought in The Modern World by Benjamin Hart Fishkin (August 27, 2014)

Dr. A. Caroline Gebhard

Professor of English

Office: Kenney Hall 70-309

Office Phone: 334-727-8283

Email: agebhard@tuskegee.edu

Ph.D. University of Virginia

M.A. University of Virginia

B.A., with distinction and honors in English, Northwestern University

Research areas:  American Literature, African American and Women’s Studies

Representative Publications & Presentations:

African American Literature in Transition: Volume 7: 1880-1900, co-edited with Barbara McCaskill (forthcoming, Cambridge University Press).

“Bess Bolden Walcott: A Legacy of Women’s Leadership at Tuskegee Institute,” Alabama Women:  Their Lives and Times, ed. Susan Youngblood Ashmore & Lisa Lundquist Dorr (University of Georgia Press, 2017), 222-238.

“Masculinity, Criminality, and Race: Alice Dunbar-Nelson’s Creole Boy Stories,” Legacy: A Journal of American Women Writers 33.2 (2016):336-360. Served as co-editor of this special issue of Legacy, “Recovering Alice Dunbar-Nelson for the 21st Century,” and co-wrote Introduction 213-53, “Reflections on the Archive,” 384-391, and introductions to republished two poems (“Writing Black Modernism,” 392-5) and two rediscovered short stories (“Recovered from the Archive,” 404-7) by Dunbar-Nelson]

“Constance Feminore Woolson’s Two Women:  1862.:  A Civil War Romance of Irreconcilable Difference,” Witness to Reconstruction:  Constance Fenimore Woolson and the Postbellum South, 1873-1894, ed. Kathleen Diffley (University of Mississippi Press, 2011), 90-106.

“Post-Bellum–Pre-Harlem”:  African American Literature and Culture, 1877-1919, anthology of original essays co-edited with Barbara McCaskill (New York University Press, 2006).  Includes co-written introduction 1-14, and my essay, “Inventing a 'Negro Literature':  Race, Dialect, and Gender in the Early Work of Paul Laurence Dunbar, James Weldon Johnson, and Alice Dunbar-Nelson,” 162-178.


Dr. Mark Henderson

Assistant Professor of English

Office: Kenney Hall 70-329

Office Phone: 334-727-2337

Email: mhenderson@tuskegee.edu

Ph.D.  English (19th- and 20th-century American literature, psychoanalytic theory), Auburn University

M.A.  (English, Creative Writing), University of Louisiana at Monroe

B.A. (English), University of Louisiana at Monroe

Research areas:  American modernism, the American Gothic, American film

Representative Publications & Presentations

  • 2018, Fall. “Losing Your Faith for Seeing Too Much:  The Anti-Bible as Indictment of American Heroism in Gregory Widen’s The Prophecy.”  Chapter in Terrifying Texts.  McFarland & Company Press.
  • 2017, Spring. “God’s Bloody Hand:  The Horrible Ambiguity of Religious Murder in Paxton’s Frailty.”  Chapter in Divine Horror.  McFarland & Company Press.
  • 2016, Fall. “Denial and Dominance in the Semantics of Buffalo Bill in The Silence of the Lambs.”  Chapter in Critical Essays for the 25th Anniversary of The Silence of the Lambs. Salem/Greyhouse Press.
  • 2016, Fall. “Coprophagia as Class and Consumerism in the Human Centipede Films.” Chapter in What’s Eating You?:  Food and Horror on Screen. Bloomsbury Publishing.
  • 2016, Summer. "Dutchman on the Brink:  The Ghost Ship as Dark (American) Nature Edgar Allan Poe's 'MS. Found in a Bottle.'"  Chapter in Dark Nature in American Literature.  Lexington Books.


Dr. Kristen Miller Hill

Assistant Professor of English

Director, Tuskegee University Writing Center

Office: Kenney Hall 70-305

Office Phone: 334-727-8776

Email: khill@tuskegee.edu

Ph.D. English (Rhetoric and Composition), Auburn University

M.A. English (Literature), Auburn University

B.A. English, LaGrange College

Research areas: rhetorical theory, composition pedagogy, film, popular culture, the horror genre, video games and literacy

Representative Publications & Presentations:

  • “Steven Spielberg” in 100 Entertainers Who Changed America, edited by Robert Sickels. ABC-CLIO, 2013. (Book Chapter)
  • “Gaming as a Woman: Gender Difference Issues in Video Games and Learning” in Immersive Environments, Augmented Realities and Virtual Worlds: Assessing Future Trends in Education, edited by Steven D’Augustino.  IGI Global, 2013. (Book Chapter)
  • “Girl Gamers Rock!: The Role of the Female in Rock Band’s World of Virtual Musicians” in Videogame Cultures and the Future of Interactive Entertainment, Edited by Daniel Riha.  Inter-Disciplinary Press, 2010.  (Book Chapter)
  • “Masks and Machine Ethos: Traces of Techno-Horror in the Slasher Film” in The Monstrous Identity of Humanity, Edited by Marlin C. Bates, IV.  Inter-Disciplinary Press, 2007.  (Book Chapter)
  • “From Fears of Entropy to Comfort in Chaos: Arcadia, The Waste Land, Numb3rs and Man’s Relationship with Science” in Bulletin of Science, Technology & Society 27.1 (2007) (Journal Article)

Personal Website: http://www.kristenhill.net


Dr. William Ndi

Associate Professor of English

Office: Kenney Hall 70-306

Office Phone: 334-727-8694

Email: wndi@tuskegee.edu

Dual Doctorate in Languages: Translation & Languages, Literatures and Contemporary Civilizations, Paris, Université de Cergy-Pontoise

Research Areas: History of Ideas and Mentalities, Film Studies, Professional, Technical and Creative Writing, World Literatures, Languages, Applied Linguistics, Literary History, Media and Communication Studies, Peace Studies and Conflict Resolution, History of Internationalism, Translation & Translatology, History and Contemporary Cultural Studies.

Representative Publications & Presentations:

  • The Repressed Expressed 
  • Secrets, Silences, and Betrayals 
  • La Logorrhée du poète ou l’Histoire des Camerouns en 33 gouttelettes, (French Poetry); 
  • Peace Mongers at War (Poetry)  
  • Barbed Forest (Poetry)

Personal Website: https://www.amazon.com/Bill-F.-Ndi/e/B00CCKC1MQ/ref=sr_tc_2_0?qid=1534977872&sr=1-2-ent